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For as many applicants as possible, I draft the first part of your Statement completely free of charge to promote my service. More than half of these applicants decide to commission me to finish drafting the entire statement. This is how I support myself and my only child Davy Dylan, laying a little something aside for his future. 

drrobertedinger@gmail.com

Fellowship, Critical Care Medicine

February 28, 2012

 


A physician from Nepal who has spent the last couple of years working and living in New York, I am a quick learner and enormously devoted to medical research. Having published on various themes, including Anemia, Diabetes, organ transplants and critical care, I have decided upon the latter as a long term focus for my ongoing medical research. It is my profound hope, since I am still only 33 years old, to be able to spend many more decades doing research in the area of critical care. My dedication to research is clearly my strongest asset, and this is why I have chosen to apply to your Critical Care Medicine Fellowship with its admirable emphasis on research.

Along with being an enormously hard worker, I am probably best distinguished by my compassion, something that I have cultivated with a near religious zeal throughout my life. Indeed, critical care is for me very much like religious devotion, dedication to one's contribution to the sanctity of human life, and the struggle to preserve life with dignity against all odds. Taking care of critically ill patients is what brings me my greatest joy in life. Still, I feel that playing a critical role in research  is my greatest calling in life since I see it as a way to maximize my contribution to the development and refinement of life saving measures. For me, medical research is a labor of love.

Having faced every challenge along the way with grit and dedication, from walking several miles to school each day as a child growing up in the mountains of Nepal, to caring for my critically ill mother during High School, I have kept my chin up and my eyes focused on hope. When my mother passed away as a result of inadequate medical care, my own path into the future was cemented in stone. Each day of my life as I labor 10, 12, 14 hours a day or longer, she remains in the back of my mind as a source of inspiration that defeats fatigue and spurs me on towards ever greater achievement.

Completing high school with very strong academic records, I was granted my wish to study medicine at Tribhuvan University in Kathmandu, a program that is renowned throughout South Asia for its community-oriented, self-directed, integrated and problem-based teaching/learning activities. From the very beginning of my studies in medicine, I have been drawn to the subfield of Internal Medicine, the combination of art and science, incisive reasoning as the cornerstone of clinical skill and compassion as the foundation of the art of patient care. My intense love for Internal Medicine serves as an excellent springboard for my life's work in Critical Care.

In addition to the nearly two years that I have now spent doing research with the Montefiore Medical Center's North Division in New York, I am certified through Deaconess Hospital in Oklahoma for Basic as well as Advanced Cardiac Life Support. My professional experience began when I was selected to serve as a Medical Officer in the Department of Internal Medicine of TU Teaching Hospital, which greatly enhanced my clinical skills serving a wide range of patients. I also became involved at that time in research and began publishing articles. Later, I had the privilege to serve as a Research Associate in 2003 and 2004 studying the effects of two consecutive monsoon seasons on rural villagers in Nepal.

I believe that my training and dedication will allow me to make important contributions to the ongoing development of our understanding of the challenges that we face in the field of Critical Care. A man of principle and staunch values of dedication to my patients and especially research to enhance our common goals, a critical thinker and a good communicator, I see diagnostics like a chess game with the highest of stakes, human life and the advancement of our field. My primary motivation in life is my undying inspiration to relieve discomfort, save lives, and show intense compassion in the care of patients along with profound respect for those with whom I work. I want to thank you for considering my application to your fellowship program.

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