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For as many applicants as possible, I draft the first part of your Statement completely free of charge to promote my service. More than half of these applicants decide to commission me to finish drafting the entire statement. This is how I support myself and my only child Davy Dylan, laying a little something aside for his future. 

drrobertedinger@gmail.com

Medical Residency Anesthesiology, Kazakhstan

March 29, 2012


For ten years, I stepped away from my true calling. What began as an entrepreneurial idea, starting a career as a computer programmer became stale and unfulfilling. While being a computer programmer provided a stable life, I realized that my heart is where it always has been: in the field of medicine. My family continued to grow, and I had to provide for them. I determined that it was time for me to show them where my pride lies, the pride I have for my mother, and the continuation of her dream and my dream.

Growing up in Kazakhstan, I was fortunate to see and hear the praises my mother's patients had for her. I lost my beloved mother, an amazing physician to Diabetes and pancreatic cancer. Her death by these terrible killers, made all the more intense by the inspiration and pride she instilled in me, were fertile ground for my medical career. Indeed, my education marked by many awards, began with a high school diploma with honors, first places in City, Regional and Medical school Chemistry XXX, and honors in my physician's diploma. My career took me to the XXX State Medical Institute in XXX, a place where I spent almost seven years, building my clinical skills and experiences. My education moved quickly, and I did my internship, surgical residency, and even became a certified translator. I worked hard and progressed from being a surgical assistant to an attending physician.

Coming to America was a choice born of wanting to immerse myself in medical situations that would increase my exposure to newer, cutting-edge technologies, techniques and a healthcare system that is arguably the finest in the world. To date, my experiences have far exceeded my expectations and I am proud to report that I am now a US citizen.

Conducting my Internal Medicine residency, I have given all that I am in terms of my energy, passion for my work and desire to convey compassionate care to patients entrusted to me as well as those of my colleagues. And yet, I have been left with the feeling that something is missing, a deeper sense that I was meant for something more in line with my sensibility and expertise. I feel I have so much to offer, with dynamism and creativity based on real-world, hands-on experiences.

I am no stranger to Anesthesiology, and have previously been involved in several aspects of general and regional anesthesia in the settings of pain management and critical care of surgical patients. In my line of work as pediatric surgeon I had many opportunities to participate in perioperative consultation work that was a time when I have found that my passion also lies with the clinical pharmacology and challenges in which a life hangs in the balance. I feel I would get tremendous satisfaction from tipping the scales in the favor of the patient in these delicate situations, using my skills, education and passion for teamwork to save a life. Coupled with this is my desire to make my patients as comfortable as possible, if not completely bring about the cessation of pain, to be the facilitator of the amelioration of a patient's life. Working alongside Anesthesiologists in the past has only increased my respect for the complexity of care required in the peri-operative patient. And yet the talented and compassionate Anesthesiologists can easily guide, comfort, and instill confidence in their patients when they need it most.

Given the influx of patients from myriad cultural backgrounds into America's healthcare system, I feel that my heritage, experiences, and skills are not only medical, but also cross-cultural. As an immigrant myself, I feel I have walked more than a mile in their shoes and am more sympathetic to their unique needs. Through my international experiences, both in the developed and developing world, I have a solid foundation with which to work from as I serve diverse patients and work with other medical professionals of differing backgrounds. Any Anesthesiologist needs to be able to quickly establish a rapport with their patients, an ability I have proven repeatedly.

In the most practical terms, a residency in Anesthesiology will put me into one of the most exciting medical professions, yet this disguises the greater truth: I have a need to fulfill my appetite for advanced intellectual challenges, and desire to aid patients in their path to recovery, a path that is as pain-free and safe as possible. Searching for the truth to who we are goes beyond looking in the mirror. Through my direct patient exposure, feedback from medical staff, and advice of my mentors I truly respect, I am all the more convinced that my future lies in Anesthesiology.

I eagerly await my Anesthesiology residency assignment and aspire to be an asset to the medical community. No other field could ever bring me a greater sense of personal and professional satisfaction. Thank you for your time and consideration.

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