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Residency Internal Medicine, Latina


My parents, grandparents, aunt, and uncles have all given their energy, lives, and careers to the world of medicine. Indeed, as a child, I remember spending my summers in my grandparent's pharmacy, ever curious about all the various collections of differently colored and shaped pills and liquids; what were they for, and what did they do? One particular summer, one of my grandfather's regular clients began coming in more frequently, buying medicine for her husband, who was in renal failure. Then one day, she stopped coming. Her husband had died, and I felt confused, upset, and left wondering how it could have happened if she'd been purchasing the medicine. I had learned empathy for a patient. Histories, anecdotes, and medical experiences were imparted to me throughout my childhood by my family. I feel that I have had their fingerprint placed in me, and my need for more medical knowledge stems from this mark. As I grew, so did my curiosity for science, how the human body functions, and how to restore it to health. My path was set, inherently. I was to become a physician.

Graduating Magna Cum Laude is an excellent litmus test for my dedication to my academic work and indicates my enthusiasm for the work I intend to do in Internal Medicine. Indeed, I channeled this devotion to my work and clinical management skills into my medical campaign work for those lacking adequate medical care in the Dominican Republic. Nothing has taught me more excellent lessons in teamwork, sacrifices, and hard work, nor has it given me more personal satisfaction than during my volunteer work.

During my four-month Surgical and Psychiatric Observership rotation at XXXX Hospital in Miami, Florida, I decided to apply for an Internal Medicine residency in the United States. The pride I felt in seeing daily improvements in my patients and managing multiple physiological and psychological challenges have only cemented my intention to follow the path of Internal Medicine. I intend to be a part of the finest medical training I can, where there are many opportunities to develop as both a clinician and a scientist, to build upon my experiences through access to a diverse patient population and innovative treatments. I have seen the residency of my dreams, which lies in the United States. I come from a developing nation, where we are constrained economically and have to make medical decisions frustratingly based upon these constraints. While this has only sharpened my resourcefulness and ability to work where I choose to educate myself will not have the financial obstacles I've encountered in the Dominican Republic. There will not be under pressure, particularly in emergencies, in which one must find that intangible balance between clinical and field knowledge, such impediments to my education. Medicine is a profession of lifelong learning, and research is the key; finding solutions to health problems and setting standards of care and disease prevention for our patient population is paramount.

The interaction I have with my patients, the doctor-patient relationship, from admittance to discharge, is of the utmost importance to me, to see the patient through from diagnosis to resolve the problem. When I see the faces of my patients filled with trust, I feel all my work has been worthwhile, and that why I became a doctor has been realized. My commitment to improving the lives of the underprivileged is unquestionable. My work for them has strengthened my collaboration and communication skills with others in a team situation. Through my education and career, I have put into practice, as an active physician, all that I have spent years achieving. This is what I will bring to my Internal Medicine residency, and more.

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